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Three steps to making the most of your new starts.

blog
21st Jan 2015

How did you feel on the first day of your new job? We all know that the induction process is critical to welcoming new starters and getting them effective as quickly and painlessly as possible.

Within 30 days new recruits will make up their mind if they are going to have a career with you.

 

Other studies and stats are:

  • 22% of labour turnover occurs in the first 45 days of employment – The Wynhurst Group
  • 46% of newbies burn out in their first 18 months – Leadership IQ
  • Companies that leave induction to chance experience failure rates of over 50% when it comes to retaining new talent – Egon Zehnder International

 

There are organisations already making sure that the induction process not only ensures loyalty but that people are ‘job ready’ as soon as possible.

 

So what makes a great induction?

 

Read our blog, the interview with Wendy Anderson from Ledingham Chalmers, or have a look on the internet, there is plenty of free advice which can help you get started. What very few organisations measure, is how successful the induction is or indeed the unique insight and past experiences that a person joining the organisation can bring.

 

In saying that here are our top 3 tips on how to ensure the induction process is as valuable to the organisation as it is to the individual:

 

If you only do three things:

 

1. Regularly review how your induction process is working for you.

It’s easy to put a great programme in place and assume all is well, however, the progress of each new starter should be regularly assessed and feedback should be given as to how the induction period is working out. As each organisation should adapt their induction to the department and job role, the person’s manager should have the confidence and initiative to adapt the induction for the individual as they work through it.

 

People learn in different ways, so make sure you provide different ways of accessing the information they need, from classroom based activities, to 1-1, to a central repository for follow up information and guides. Make sure you accommodate all learning styles and ensure one trainer has a continuous presence during the induction process to maintain progress and consistency.

 

Also get some super users trained up in key office basics, such as the printers, basic IT housekeeping functions. View the induction as a ‘getting to know each other’ period rather than a one-way flow of information from the company to the individual.

 

2. Be accessible, honest and interested.

As people join a new organisation this is the time when they will have ideas for how things could be improved. Spend some time with the new inductee as part of your on boarding process. This way questions about ‘how we do things’ are highlighted and you never know, there may be some great solutions that your business hasn’t yet thought about that could be incorporated.

 

At Appetite we have changed the way we do on boarding as a result of innovative ideas from those who have joined us which has really helped us streamline our processes and saved cost.

 

3. The induction period should not just be the initial ‘orientation’ on Day 1.

Best-in-class organisations are 30% more likely to have on boarding programs that last one month or longer.’ say O.C. Tanner. Our customers put in place inductions that span the first year of the new inductees career. It’s not enough to simply leave people ‘to get on with it’, throwing them in at the deep end doesn’t add any value. Some people take some time to develop but end up very capable in the long term. You may lose good people by throwing them in at the deep end.

 

Our customers put in place inductions that span the first year of the new inductees career. It’s not enough to simply leave people ‘to get on with it’, throwing them in at the deep end doesn’t add any value. Some people take some time to develop but end up very capable in the long term. You may lose good people by throwing them in at the deep end.

 

It’s probably taken a long time and a lot of effort to get your culture and processes right, so don’t expect people to pick it up straight away. Continually check how people are doing. Carry out weekly catch ups to check how things are going, what additional areas of learning are required or what would be useful to help the inductee perform their role. Targeted training can really build confidence and skill.

 

Building real-life scenarios and events will help explain points in your training, therefore ensuring the delegates engage and take more away with them.

 

So what if you did this?

  • Your induction programme will not only engage people, make them feel their feedback is valued and ensure they stay; but will also improve the process for the next person that joins your organisation.
  • You’ll be continually assessing and improving the way things are done in the company; ensuring that new people feel they are having a say in what happens.

 

People will seamlessly integrate into the organisation and become productive and ‘job ready’ sooner rather than later.

Let’s chat, Now that you know who we are, we’d like to get to know you.

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